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Real Estate

Price Check: How about a Roncesvalles loft, a stacked townhouse in Earlscourt or a condo at the foot of Fort York?

What is $800,000-ish fetching this summer? Three different neighbourhoods deliver three different results

Price Check: How about a Roncesvalles loft, a stacked townhouse in Earlscourt or a condo at the foot of Fort York?

Sky-high interest rates have cooled the Toronto real estate market, forcing sellers to lower their asking prices. The intense bidding wars of early spring have also largely disappeared. That means bargains are there for the taking, especially for properties well below the $1 million mark. Here are three very different homes in three very different neighbourhoods that recently sold for less than $850,000.


Roncesvalles Village: An airy loft with a parking spot

Sold for: $777,000 Listing price: $599,000 Date sold: July 13, 2023 Bedrooms: 1+1 Bathrooms: 1 Size: 600 square feet Maintenance fees: $519 a month Agent: Steve Baird

This one-bedroom condo is in a trendy mid-rise complex in Roncesvalles. The place doesn’t include much outdoor space: it only has a Juliet balcony. However, it does come with a parking spot—a rarity for lofts in this part of town. Due to uncertainty in the face of the latest rate hike, the sellers played it safe and listed below market value. And home seekers were immediately interested. On July 12, the same day it was listed, a buyer made an offer at $178,000 over asking. The sellers accepted within 24 hours.

This loft in Roncesvalles Village has a parking spot
This Roncesvalles condo sold well above asking.
A mid-rose west end Toronto loft with ample space

Earlscourt: A stacked townhouse by a sprawling park

Sold for: $819,900 Listing price: $888,800 Date sold: July 17, 2023 Bedrooms: 3 Bathrooms: 2 Size: 1,023 square feet Maintenance fees: $599 a month Agent: Danny Gaudio

This three-bedroom stacked condo townhouse last sold for $277,000 in 2009. Along with two parking spots, it also has renovated bathrooms and brand-new flooring in the living room. The place is a short walk from the shops and restaurants of St. Clair and the Junction Triangle. In early May, referencing similar properties, the sellers listed for $888,800—more than triple the previous sale price. But the market slowdown had already started by then, so after two months of futility, they lowered their ask by roughly $70,000. That price adjustment did the trick: a buyer quickly agreed to match their asking.

A stacked townhouse complex in Earlscourt
This Earlscourt townhouse sold for under asking
Price Check: How about a Roncesvalles loft, a stacked townhouse in Earlscourt or a condo at the foot of Fort York?

Niagara: A condo sandwiched between Fort York and the lake

Sold for: $775,000 Listing price: $699,900 Date sold: July 25, 2023 Bedrooms: 2 Bathrooms: 1 Size: 700 square feet Maintenance fees: $617 a month Agent: Erin McLaughlin

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The owners of this two-bedroom condo wanted to sell so they could upgrade to a bigger property. The place is a ground-floor unit with 12-foot ceilings, equipped with building amenities such as a pool and fitness centre. On July 6, hoping to spark a bidding war, the sellers priced the listing under market value at $699,900. But six days later, the Bank of Canada raised interest rates for the second time in as many months, further softening an already weak market. The sellers then shifted strategies, re-listing at $779,900, a figure closer to their ideal target. About two weeks later, after a brief negotiation, they successfully sold for $775,000.

This condo sits at the foot of Fort York
The Bank of Canada's recent rate hike halted any chance at selling this Fort York home for more
Price Check: How about a Roncesvalles loft, a stacked townhouse in Earlscourt or a condo at the foot of Fort York?

Are you an agent with tips for house hunters? Send your story to realestate@torontolife.com

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