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Food & Drink

The Glenlivet’s latest expression shifts food pairing from grape to grain

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Single malt meets Cognac casks in The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old

The Glenlivet's latest expression shifts food pairing from grape to grain

Traditionally poured as an indulgence to enjoy solo, whisky—particularly single malt Scotch—is less often thought of as a complement to cuisine. The Glenlivet, however, is breaking convention and encouraging consumers to reimagine the single malt category by releasing a dynamic new expression: The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old.  

For food lovers, wine is no longer the sole dinner table companion used to enhance flavours, textures and the overall dining experience. Combining the brand’s iconic profile of citrus, flora, and velvet with the influence of select ex-Cognac casks, The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old has ushered in a new era of exquisite opportunities in food pairing. Poised for the modern whisky lover, its unique flavour combination is its biggest strength. 

The Glenlivet's latest expression shifts food pairing from grape to grain

“We crafted this expression with the curious single malt community in mind,” said retired Master Distiller at The Glenlivet, Alan Winchester. “The beauty of the whisky lover is that their palate is always evolving, searching for the next flavour experience, and we’re proud to add this delicious aged single malt to our portfolio.” This particular expression is first aged in American sherry casks before being finished in ex-Cognac casks, which leaves the palate with a remarkably luscious finish and brings about a synergy with foods traditionally paired with wine. Where typical whisky often leads with flavours of malt, dried fruit and sometimes a smokiness, The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old distinguishes itself from the ordinary with sweet and fruity aromas of honey and apricot jam, notes of sweet cinnamon bread and a subtle sensation of spicy licorice. If its rich gold colour wasn’t charming enough, sippers will be captivated by its components of mandarin, ripe poached pears and chocolate-dipped raisin. 

The Glenlivet's latest expression shifts food pairing from grape to grain
Cocktail curated for the exclusive Toronto Life Insiders event hosted at Stock T.C.

Though a new release, this latest iteration by The Glenlivet is already inspiring dining tables to switch from grape to grain. For an exclusive event at Stock T.C, Toronto Life Insiders were treated to a specially-curated tasting menu by Executive Chef Giacomo Pasquini. “The hint of bourbon, sweet elegant and smooth cognac, and fruit notes present in the Glenlivet 14-Year-Old inspired me to design a pairing menu with classic and earthy recipes that elevate the complexity of this beautiful whiskey,” he shares. 

The alluring menu showcased dishes with flavour profiles that pull from The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old’s distinct palate: Foie gras torchon with orange marmalade, eight-week aged Striploin and a Whisky raisin pain perdu. 

If you’re yet to pair your whisky with anything more than an ice sphere, let this be your sign to explore. Like cheese and steak, whisky is an indulgence that gets better with age, making these three items a natural start. From there, it’s important to taste your whisky and identify what flavours you find most appealing. In The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old, that could be syrupy fruit—in which case a sweet and salty pairing with a pan-fried pasta might do the trick. Or, if you gravitate to the undertones of spice and chocolate—enhance the flavour with a smokey cheese or cocoa-topped tuna. What’s most exciting about this new whisky and food pairing venture is that you’re bound to discover something new about your creativity and appetite. 

Click here to experience the endless possibilities of The Glenlivet whisky and food pairing by shopping The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old in the TL x Runner Storefront.

 

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