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Genie nominations no big surprise, with Barney’s Version and Incendies in the lead

Genie nominations no big surprise, with Barney’s Version and Incendies in the lead

We’ve already watched the Golden Globes. And Oscar nominations were announced last week. But that doesn’t mean we can forget about Canada’s version of the Academy Awards (albeit with less recognizable statues), the Genies. The nominations were announced today, and this year’s Genie picks seem fairly predictable—the widely acclaimed Barney’s Version roped in eleven nominations, including best picture, direction, adapted screen play and best lead and supporting actor nods.  Denis Villeneuve’s Oscar-nominated Incendies netted an even ten.

Filling out the best actor category is Jay Baruchel (who we’ll always remember for Popular Mechanics for Kids) for The Trotsky, as well as Timothy Olyphant for High Life, Robert Naylor for 10 ½ and François Papineau for Route 132. The best picture category also includes Daniel Grou’s 10½, Xavier Dolan’s Les amours imaginaires, and Vincenzo Natali’s Splice, starring Sarah Polley and Adrien Brody. IncendiesLubna Azabal is nominated for best leading actress, as is Tatiana Maslany for Grown Up Movie Star, Molly Parker for TIFF favourite Trigger, Giamatti’s Barney co-star Rosamund Pike, and the late Tracy Wright, for her turn in Trigger.

The Genie Awards take place March 10, and will be broadcast on CBC.

Barney’s Version, Incendies lead Genie nominations [Globe and Mail]

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