Advertisement
Style

Rad Hourani shares his window into the future at Toronto Fashion Week

Rad Hourani shares his window into the future at Toronto Fashion Week

When fashion media heard Rad Hourani’s “Collection #5” would be showing at Toronto Fashion Week, most agreed that it was somewhat of a coup for the FDCC. Of course, this wasn’t the debut of the collection, but it was interesting to see a designer of his calibre show alongside designers trying to make their mark. Guests like Tommy Ton, performer Diamond Rings, model Stacey McKenzie (who we’re told dashed off to vintage boutique Magwood between shows to procure some statement jewellery) and a smattering of impossibly cool neck-tattooed people who stole front row seats, all sat to watch Hourani’s introductory film (which was a series of animated GIFs on loop) and take in his futuristic unisex collection.

Click here to see Rad Hourani’s fall/winter 2012 collection »

Many were overheard saying things like “you don’t see tailoring like that at Toronto Fashion Week,” and we have to agree—Hourani’s angular cuts and slim fits are exceptionally crafted. While his collections typically feature black, he introduced a khaki and mossy green into the fold, playing off his successful spring 2012 collection where he used various shades of blue. Origami-like folds on layered leather lapels were certainly dramatic, but paired with nothing but leggings and a black top, it didn’t seem too ostentatious, and we loved Hourani’s accessories, like boxy leather rucksacks that slung down at the lower back, and streamlined motorcycle boots. The collection definitely evokes a Logan’s Run aesthetic, given Hourani’s propensity toward collarless shirts and lapel-less jackets paired with marching band–style leggings, but it is easy to appreciate what he’s accomplished, because everything fits beautifully (sure, you have to be rakish) and every jacket, shirt, bag and shoe is something we could see being desired (heck, we desire about 90 per cent of this collection).

NEVER MISS A TORONTO LIFE STORY

Sign up for This City, our free newsletter about everything that matters right now in Toronto politics, sports, business, culture, society and more.

By signing up, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.
You may unsubscribe at any time.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Big Stories

The Battle for Leslieville: Gentrification, opioids and murder in the city’s most divided neighbourhood
Deep Dives

The Battle for Leslieville: Gentrification, opioids and murder in the city’s most divided neighbourhood