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Food & Drink

The Month That Was: the Toronto restaurants and bars that opened and closed in October

The Month That Was: the Toronto restaurants and bars that opened and closed in October
Sweet chili chicken wings from Soos on Ossington (Image: Caroline Aksich)

Openings

Hey Meatball—The mix ’n match meatball shop has a new location at Queen and Logan. Read our Introducing Post »

La Cubana—A retro Cuban diner in Roncy from the owners of Ossington bistro Delux.

Read our Introducing Post »

Estrella Taqueria—This honky tonk–themed resto-bar serves bourbon cocktails and duck confit tacos. Read our Introducing post »

Soos—A new family-run Malaysian joint on the Ossington strip. Read our Introducing Post »

Reds Midtown Tavern—The downtown power-restaurant’s sleek second location at Yonge and Gerrard. Read our Introducing post »

The Fifth Pub House and Café—A pair of casual additions to The Fifth’s Richmond Street dine-o-plex. Read our Introducing Post »

Nespresso Boutique Bar—Yorkville’s Cumberland Theatre becomes a 14,000-square foot art deco café and retail space. Read our Introducing post »

Luce—The new King West trattoria caters to the gluten-free set. Read our Introducing post »

Gourmet Gringos—A sit-down space at Bathurst and St. Clair from Toronto’s popular Latin American food truck. Read our Dish post »

Hi Lo Bar—A new Riverside clubhouse for east-enders still mourning the loss of The Avro. Read our Dish Post »

Through Being Cool Vegan Baking Co.—The quaint Bloordale bakery serves vegan doughnuts and pizza buns. Read our Introducing Post »

Delysées—A contemporary French patisserie at King and Tecumseth. Read our Dish Post »

Pukka—A new Indian restaurant on St. Clair from a pair of sommeliers. [Pukka]

Olde Towne Oyster Bar—Downtown bistro Lucien has been re-imagined as a casual seafood tavern. Read our Dish Post »

Simone’s Caribbean—A casual new Jamaican eatery on the Danforth. [Post City]

Kintaro—Another addition to the city’s ever-growing contingent of Japanese izakayas. [Kintaro]

Nakayoshi—And another. [Yelp]

Grillies—This new Danforth diner serves a classic lineup of burgers, fries and shakes. [Grillies]

Closings

Keriwa—The beloved Native Canadian eatery was unable to bounce back from damage caused by the July flood. Read our Dish Post »

A-OK Foods—The Queen West ramen bar announced its impending closure with a desperado-style video. Read our Dish Post »

White Squirrel Snack Shop—The eclectic lunch counter closed after less than six months on Queen West. [The Grid]

Que Supper Club—The clubby Queen East barbecue joint lasted less than three months . [Chowhound]

Obika—The international mozzarella bar closed mid-month. [Post City]

The Construction Site—The midtown grilled cheese shop has been replaced by another outpost of Smoke’s Poutinerie. [BlogTO]

Smokeless Joe’s—The Little Italy pub commemorated its closure with a moving sale. [The Grid]

The Big Fish—The Queen West seafood restaurant papered its windows mid-month. Its sister restaurant in Leslieville remains open. [The Grid]

Vicki’z Vegetarian Eatery—The short-lived College Street lunch counter is making way for a new ramen shop from the owners of Cabbagetown’s Kingyo. [BlogTO]

Mavrik—The wine bar’s Queen West digs will become the permanent home of sandwich pop-up Come And Get It. Read our Dish Post »

KiWe Kitchen—The King West trattoria closed quietly at the beginning of the month. [Blog TO]

Bar Salumi—The Parkdale hotspot was purchased by one of its former chefs, who is turning the space into a casual lunch spot. [Post City]

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