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A new craft brewery and beer store is coming to Leslieville

(Images: Left Field Brewery/Facebook)
(Images: Left Field Brewery/Facebook)

Contract brewers are the pop-up restaurateurs of the craft beer world: they’re beer-makers with brands to promote and products to hock but no physical digs, and the most ambitious among them occasionally graduate to full-fledged brewership. Such is the case with Left Field Brewery, a nine-month-old brewing operation that recently announced the launch of 6,000-square-foot brewery in northeast Leslieville, near Greenwood and Gerrard.

Left Field is a baseball-themed brand run by husband and wife team Mark and Mandie Murphy. Their beers earned a place on the craft beer map—and instant cred with beer enthusiasts—when they scored in the semi-finals at last year’s Cask Days festival. They’ve since landed on the menus at over 60 Toronto bars and restaurants, including Bar Hop, Terroni Bar Centrale and new board-gaming bar Snakes and Lagers.

The new brewery will eventually include a retail outlet where shoppers can score the label’s core brands, like the hoppy 6-4-3 Double-IPA and highly drinkable Eephus Oatmeal Brown ale. A few things need to fall into place first, though, including a retail license and the installation of a 20-hectolitre brewing system—all of which means the official launch likely won’t happen until next year. Those interested in sampling some beers and checking out the space are invited to attend an open house at the future brewery on February 22.

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