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An Edwardian home gets a modern update—and the kitchen is king

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Step into an Annex time machine that’s 1910 on the outside—and 2025 on the inside

An Edwardian home gets a modern update—and the kitchen is king
Jillian Jackson

When Michael and Vanessa Hyatt started a renovation during the pandemic, they prioritized a space where they could comfortably quarantine. Think movie theatre, pool, wine fridge, elevator and more. And with three young kids—Sofia, three and a half, and two-year-old twins Aviana and Sienna—they needed a space that would also suit family living. “It was critical for us to have a home that made us feel happy and relaxed,” says Michael, a serial investor and entrepreneur. Vanessa, an attorney, adds: “And we wanted it to feel spacious, so we wouldn’t feel hunkered down.”  They teamed up with Fluid Living Studio and Bolt Developments to bring their vision to life. And to this family who quite literally never orders in, a functional open-concept kitchen was key. Now, even with all their amenities, the kitchen is where they spend most of their time—and it’s easy to see why.

An Edwardian home gets a modern update—and the kitchen is king
Michael and Vanessa Hyatt
Height matters

The sprawling 30-by-34-foot kitchen enjoys loads of light with 12.5-foot-high floor-to-ceiling windows and a sliding glass door. To keep sightlines open, the Hyatts opted for under-counter storage instead of uppers. And the pièce de résistance? A showpiece solid-steel shelving structure designed by Fluid Living that’s suspended from the ceiling in a dramatic display.

Storage smarts

They may not have uppers, but the Hyatts still have more storage than they can use, from the custom wine fridge that holds 400 bottles to the impressive 14-foot island and ceiling-height corner cabinets. “The drawers light up, too,” notes Michael, who loves sleek technological details like speakers hidden behind drywall, and a Savant lighting system that allows him to dim the lights and set a scene with the touch of a button. “The two things I love most about this space are the sleekness and the technology.”

An Edwardian home gets a modern update—and the kitchen is king
Jillian Jackson
Technology tops

The kitchen is crammed with state-of-the-art Miele appliances—including two G7000 dishwashers, two PureLine M Touch ovens, a speed oven and an induction cooktop from Miele’s Generation 7000 Series, which fits flush against every surface for a sleek, built-in look—but it’s the technology that really stands out. “The ovens heat fast, which is amazing because as much as I like to plan ahead, I often feel like I’m playing catch-up, so I can now cook quickly,” says Vanessa, noting that the oven doors open by themselves, which prevents overcooking, keeping food warm and then cooling just as efficiently. “Plus, everything is connected to the Miele@home mobile app, which tells me when something’s ready or when the dishwasher is done at night.” Michael jumps in excitedly: “And watch this!” He knocks lightly on the dishwasher door, and it opens like magic. 

An Edwardian home gets a modern update—and the kitchen is king
Jillian Jackson
Function junction

In this kitchen, functionality is key. “There are 42 inches between the island and the wall, so two people can manoeuvre without grinding,” says Michael, who points out the two sinks, two fridges, two dishwashers and three ovens that are packed comfortably in the space. “We use everything all the time,” he says. “Feeding kids, nannies, parents and more, we can be browning, baking and reheating at the same time.” All the while, he and Vanessa can keep an eye on the kids playing in the attached family area, so this close family can stay close and share what they love best: a home-cooked meal.

An Edwardian home gets a modern update—and the kitchen is king
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