Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

Real Weddings: Jordyn and Ben

By Roxy Kirshenbaum| Photography by Assaf Friedman Photography
| August 14, 2019

Jordyn and Ben Cowley met at a house party in 2014. They were both studying law—Jordyn at Western, Ben at Windsor—and their respective best friends, who happened to be dating, introduced them.

Ben was just visiting London for the weekend, but the two stayed in touch and would meet up whenever they were back in Toronto, where they both grew up. After eight months, Jordyn decided Ben was her boyfriend. “He’d never had a girlfriend before, so I made the first move,” says Jordyn.

Soon after they both graduated, they bought a house together in Toronto. Four and a half years later, Ben proposed. He reached out to the Arkells, their favourite band, to see if frontman Max Kerman would record a special video for the occasion. When Jordyn got home from work one night, Ben greeted her with his laptop and a video of Kerman saying, “I hear you’re getting hitched.” Then, Ben pulled out a box of macarons (Jordyn’s favourite treat), along with a letter written on paper towel (they used to leave paper towel notes for each other whenever they couldn’t find Post-Its) and a ring. She said yes.

They planned an industrial-themed celebration at The Symes with their massive bridal party.

Cheat Sheet

Date: March 2, 2019 Venue: The Symes Planner: Melissa Baum Events Photography: Assaf Friedman Photography Videographer: Hidden Light Films Bride’s dress: Romona Keveza Groom’s suit: Custom-made by Sushant Food: The Edible Story Hair and makeup: Allison Kam, Fl.aw.less Flowers: Nous Design Group Invitations and stationery: Paper and Poste Guests: 250

Jordyn spent the morning getting ready at her house with her bridesmaids:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

They had a teary first look in their living room:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

Here’s the bridal party. Each bridesmaid picked out a different dress in dark grey:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

There were a few more tears during the ceremony:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding
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Breaking the glass didn’t go according to plan: Ben ended up cutting his foot up pretty badly. After the ceremony, one of their guests (a doctor) ran home to grab his suture kit so he could give Ben four stitches:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

To keep with the industrial theme, they used cinder block centrepieces adorned with white flowers and string lights:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

They kept dinner casual by serving up Big Mac–inspired gourmet cheeseburgers and family-style sides, including mac ‘n’ cheese and salads:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

The couple had their first dance to “And Then Some” by the Arkells:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

There was a Horah with a twist. Ben and his groomsmen put on custom Leafs shirts with their nicknames printed on the back. Instead of holding up the traditional napkin, they opted for a Leafs flag. (They’re both fans, clearly):

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

There was a 12-piece band to get the party bumping:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding

Jordyn and Ben had this neon sign custom-made for their big day. They started calling each other “dear” to send up other couples who constantly say “babe”:

Real Weddings: Inside an industrial warehouse wedding
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