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What people are saying about the Humboldt Broncos tragedy

A Friday bus crash in Saskatchewan took the lives of 15 people associated with the Humboldt Broncos, a junior hockey team. Among the dead are several young players, the team’s head coach, and the driver of the bus. As the country mourns this senseless loss and donates to the team’s GoFundMe, here’s a sampling of the outpouring of sympathy on Twitter.

The Toronto Maple Leafs and rivals the Montreal Canadiens will both make donations to the GoFundMe:

Toronto’s other big-league sports teams sent thoughts and prayers:

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Hockey commentator Ron MacLean had some words for the families:

Logan Boulet, one of the players who died, had signed his organ donor card just two weeks before the crash and was able to give six organs to people in need, as TSN’s Gino Reda reports:

The Toronto sign at Nathan Phillips Square was lit in green and yellow in honour of the team, before going dark at 6 p.m. in memoriam:

Another iconic Toronto symbol shone in Humboldt colours:

Strombo sent love to the families, communities and first responders:

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Peter Mansbridge, eloquent as always, summed it up well:

Also from Mansbridge, a poignant photo of some survivors holding hands in the hospital:

A photo from the scene of the crash, by Global Saskatoon reporter and anchor Ryan Kessler, shows a broken copy of the classic hockey film Slap Shot:

Singer songwriter Donovan Woods promised to donate his fees from his upcoming Saskatchewan shows to the GoFundMe:

Toronto Blue Jay Marcus Stroman will be auctioning off the hat he wore during April 7’s game against the Texas Rangers, with proceeds going “towards the cause.”

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Twitter-famous Toronto city councillor Norm Kelly implored people who pray to do so for the lives lost in Saskatchewan:

And the Queen also sent her condolences:

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