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Lax organics standards, gardens on the Gardiner, slaughterhouses self-inspect

Lax organics standards, gardens on the Gardiner, slaughterhouses self-inspect
What does “organic” mean, in Canada? (Photo by Gabo Morales)

• The label “certified organic” should spark more questions than confidence, says former food inspector Mischa Popoff, who argues that Canada’s organic food regulations are far too lenient to ensure quality products. [National Post]

Foodshare believes in eating locally, which doesn’t just mean buying veggies from the Holland Marsh. The Toronto-based NGO is advocating transforming our barren urban spaces—Nathan Phillips Square, University Avenue, the edges of the Gardiner—into vegetable gardens. [Toronto Star]

• Canada’s new inspection protocol allowing slaughterhouses to inspect themselves is so dubious it’s making news across the pond. [Farming UK]

Riverdale restaurant owner Chandaramony Eang’s decision to return to his native Cambodia to pursue his charity work means Toronto will lose Angkor—the city’s first Cambodian eatery. [Torontoist]

• Toronto isn’t the only city trying to get its organic waste management under control. In two years, Côte St. Luc went from having the lowest recycling rates on the island of Montreal to diverting 60 per cent of its waste from landfills. [Montreal Gazette]

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