Advertisement
Food & Drink

Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest

Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest

It’s harvest time, and that means the Picnic at the Brick Works is close at hand. In only its third year, this annual celebration supporting the sustainable-food movement has become one of Toronto’s favourite food events, largely due to the contributions of big-name restaurants (Langdon Hall, Canoe, Frank and Cowbell, to name but a few). This time around, participants will follow a “locally global” theme, paying homage to the city’s multicultural milieu while showcasing delicious partnerships between chefs and farmers. The event is not until Sunday, but in anticipation, we’ve prepared this tantalizing slide show from last year’s edition.

Picnic at the Brick Works, Oct. 4, noon–4. $110. 550 Bayview Ave., 416-596-1495, ext. 300, evergreen.ca/picnic.

Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest
Food Porn: the Brick Works Picnic shows off the local harvest

NEVER MISS A TORONTO LIFE STORY

Sign up for Table Talk, our free newsletter with essential food and drink stories.

By signing up, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.
You may unsubscribe at any time.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Big Stories

The Battle for Leslieville: Gentrification, opioids and murder in the city’s most divided neighbourhood
Deep Dives

The Battle for Leslieville: Gentrification, opioids and murder in the city’s most divided neighbourhood