Advertisement
Culture

Lena Dunham, Barbra Streisand and seven more American celebrities plotting their move to Canada

For the past year and a half, celebrity Clinton fans have been planning to leave the U.S. in the event of a Trump presidency. Some, like Cher, said they’d make Jupiter their new home, others said London or Spain, and a handful claimed they’d relocate to Canada. Now that the election’s in the bag, here are nine celebs who might have crashed our immigration website last night.

Raven Symone

Symone declared her intent to move to Canada way back in February. Her response to Trump’s win (above) is pretty straight-forward.

Lena Dunham
Advertisement

According to an interview with the Hollywood Reporter, the Girls creator’s Canadian city of choice would be Vancouver.

Barbra Streisand

We’re getting Babs! Maybe. If Australia doesn’t want her.

Chloë Sevigny

When asked by Vanity Fair where she would move if Trump became president, Sevigny responded: “Nova Scotia.” Her Instagram account went dark today.

Ne-Yo

Caught by a TMZ camera guy earlier this month, the R&B crooner said being Drake’s neighbour wouldn’t be such a bad idea. Today, he’s simply #disappointed.

Bryan Cranston

In a recent episode of the Bestseller Experiment podcast, when asked if he would “fancy” an extended vacay to Canada if Trump won, Cranston said he wouldn’t consider himself a tourist—he’d be an expat.

Keegan-Michael Key

On the Daily Show, Peele’s other half said he wishes he still lived in Detroit, because of it’s proximity to the Canadian border.

Neve Campbell

The House of Cards (and Party of Five and Scream) star told the Huffington Post that she’d come back to us.

Stephen King

The man who’s job it is to scare the bejeezus out of people told the Washington Post that a Trump presidency terrifies him “more than anything else,” and he was considering a move to Canada.

NEVER MISS A TORONTO LIFE STORY

Sign up for This City, our free newsletter about everything that matters right now in Toronto politics, sports, business, culture, society and more.

By signing up, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.
You may unsubscribe at any time.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Big Stories

The Battle for Leslieville: Gentrification, opioids and murder in the city’s most divided neighbourhood
Deep Dives

The Battle for Leslieville: Gentrification, opioids and murder in the city’s most divided neighbourhood