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This creative director makes $60,000 a year. How is she spending during the pandemic?

By Roxy Kirshenbaum| Photography by Erin Leydon
This creative director makes $60,000 a year. How is she spending during the pandemic?

Who Tirza Yassa, 22 Where she lives A one-bed, one-bath condo near Yonge and Wellesley What she does Freelance graphic designer, creative director and marketing consultant What she makes Approximately $60,000 a year

Regular Expenses

Rent $1,400 a month, including utilities.

Internet $0. “My landlord is the best—he gives me free Wi-Fi.”

Phone $110 a month, for an iPhone 11 with unlimited talk and text.

Groceries $250 a month.

Takeout $300 a month. “I like to order sushi from Fushimi on Church Street.”

Health Care $470 a month, for a therapist and a naturopath. “I’m super anxious about my mental and physical health, so I’m always getting checked out.”

This creative director makes $60,000 a year. How is she spending during the pandemic?

Uber $200 a month. “When I’m doing production-type work on sets I’ll take an Uber.”

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Juice $100 a month, from Greenhouse Juice Co. “My favourite flavour is Gatsby, which has cucumber, kale and ginger.”

Fitness $40 a month, for Fitsqr, an online workout program. “It’s got a bunch of short on-demand routines, either 15 or 30 minutes, which I can do at home any time.”

Recent Splurges

Residency Application $2,500. “In 2015, I came here from Qatar. Since then, I’ve been working to make Toronto my permanent home.”

Mattress $850, for a queen-sized pillow-top, from Endy. “My mom told me to always invest in two things: your bed and your shoes. That’s what you spend the most time in.”

Perfume $440, for a 70-mL bottle of Maison Francis Kurkdjian Baccarat Rouge 540, from Holt Renfrew. “It smells like wood and amber, with a hint of jasmine.”

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