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Michael Bryant to write book about cyclist’s death so the world can finally hear his side

Former attorney general Michael Bryant is writing a memoir titled 28 Seconds about the contentious moments leading to the death of cyclist Darcy Sheppard. According to a press release, the aptly named book is an “unflinching description of one man’s descent into a kind of hell,” and will “chronicle the fateful aftermath of that late summer evening in August 2009, an evening when everything changed.” We thought Bryant wanted everybody to just forget about that fateful evening—which, really, everybody probably had—but apparently he actually wants everybody to remember it and relive it. 

The TV serial drama tell-all book also examines Bryant’s personal problems, “some of the very demons shared by Darcy Sheppard.” Whether this refers to substance abuse, fathering illegitimate children or a failed stand-up comedy career, we can’t say, but considering Bryant is on the board of the Pine River Institute (which helps mentally ill and drug-addicted teens), we have our guesses.

We’re also excited to learn about his resulting quest for judicial reform, which has flown under the radar thus far. “It’s important to pass along lessons learned regarding our justice system,” Bryant says in the release. “I’m ready to speak to these very personal issues.” What’s less exciting though is that this all has the makings of the early stages of a political comeback, no?

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