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The basketball world has some mixed feelings about Kyle Lowry’s $100-million deal with the Toronto Raptors

The basketball world has some mixed feelings about Kyle Lowry's $100-million deal with the Toronto Raptors
Photograph from Instagram

When Kyle Lowry opted out of the final year of his contract with the Raptors in March, Toronto took it as a sign that the all-star point guard would soon take his talents to another team. But, this weekend, he decided he’d stay put, explaining his decision in the Players’ Tribune. It’ll cost the Raps, who will pay Lowry as much as $100 million over the next three years. Some fans think it’s worth it; others, not so much. Here’s a look at what the basketball world had to say about the deal.

First, to put that salary in context:

And a closer analysis:

It was only a matter of time before someone turned the deal into a Drake meme (Lowry’s contract was recently rumoured at $200 million):

The contract inspired writer Shea Serrano to reconsider his parenting strategies:

Fans in Minnesota were upset the Timberwolves didn’t sign Lowry:

But this Toronto fan is glad the boys are back together:

Then came the haters:

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Some couldn’t wonder how Lowry would make more than NBA champion Kevin Durant, who re-signed with the Golden State Warriors at $53 million over two years:

Of course, someone resurrected that video of Kevin Hart (a five-foot-four comedian, for the record) blocking Lowry:

This guy’s rant, however, takes the cake:

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