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There will be Toronto players—but no Maple Leafs—on the 2014 men’s Olympic hockey team

There will be Toronto players—but no Maple Leafs—on the 2014 men’s Olympic hockey team
Players at Hockey Canada’s Olympic orientation camp in August. (Image: Jeff Vinnick)

Hockey Canada has just announced the men’s hockey roster for the Sochi Olympics, and the news, at least as far as Toronto is concerned, is bittersweet. On the good side, several players with local roots made the team. P.K. Subban, the Toronto-raised phenom, will be taking some time away from the Montreal Canadiens to lace up for his country. Also on the list is Brampton’s Rick Nash, now of the New York Rangers. Oakville’s John Tavares will be on loan from the New York Islanders.

Even so, Toronto fans will be saddened—but likely not surprised—to learn that not a single Maple Leaf made the team. The only one to attend Hockey Canada’s Olympic training camp in August was Dion Phaneuf, and he’s staying home. Some Leafs will be playing for their home countries, though.

The full Olympic roster is below.

Goaltenders: Roberto Luongo, Carey Price, Mike Smith Defencemen: Jay Bouwmeester, Drew Doughty, Duncan Keith, Dan Hamhuis, Alex Peitrangelo, P.K. Subban, Marc-Édouard Vlasic, Shea Weber Forwards: Jamie Benn, Patrice Bergeron, Jeff Carter, Sidney Crosby, Matt Duchene, Ryan Getzlaf, Chris Kunitz, Patrick Marleau, Rick Nash, Corey Perry, Patrick Sharp, Steven Stamkos, John Tavares, Jonathan Toews

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