Do you know who you’re voting for in tomorrow’s provincial election?

Do you know who you’re voting for in tomorrow’s provincial election?

(Image: Horwath: Andrea Horwath/Facebook; Wynne: Loralea Carruthers/Facebook; Hudak: Ontario Chamber of Commerce) (Image: Horwath: Andrea Horwath/Facebook; Wynne: Loralea Carruthers/Facebook; Hudak: Ontario Chamber of Commerce)
 

The 2014 provincial election is on Thursday, and it’s bound to be a tough one. Ontario voters have a choice between a Liberal party that has squandered billions of dollars on ill-conceived projects, a Conservative party that is basically lying when it says its austerity agenda will create a million jobs and an NDP leadership that seems content to offer little more than a smattering of “save you money”-style promises. It’s a state of affairs that has some people advocating for the “none of the above” option (which is something that actually exists). But, of course, there are also plenty of people and organizations that are picking favourites.

The Toronto Sun, of course, would like you to vote for Tim Hudak’s Tories, because “we cannot spend ourselves rich.” The Post is also going for Hudak this time around, mostly out of loathing for the Liberals. The Globe’s editorial board, meanwhile, released a head-scratcher of an endorsement, calling for a Hudak-led minority government, which isn’t something Ontarians can even really vote for. (It’s sort of like saying, “Okay, some of you vote PC. But not too many of you!”) The Star, alone among the major dailies, has come out in full support of premier Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals, under the assumption that Wynne has earned her party a second chance. Torontoist agrees. On a more individual level, The Grid’s Edward Keenan thinks you should vote for (as opposed to against) something, and Metro’s Matt Elliott thinks you should really consider the Green party.

The important thing, though, is that everybody actually does go ahead and vote. It’s easy; all you need is a drivers’ license or another comparable piece of ID. The province even has a handy website where you can look up your local polling location. Whichever party wins this election will have more say over big-ticket projects in Toronto (like, for instance, subway construction) than whichever municipal candidate manages to take the throne from Rob Ford this October. Casting a ballot is very much worth the effort.