Advertisement
Food & Drink

Review: Ardor Bistro brings Peruvian ceviche and pisco cocktails to the Ossington strip

Review: Ardor Bistro brings Peruvian ceviche and pisco cocktails to the Ossington strip

Ardor Bistro ★★ 59 Ossington Ave., 647-351-5100

We’ve updated our star ratings system since this article was first published. Read more about the change here, and find the up-to-date rating in our restaurant listings.

Ossington’s newest restaurant adds Peru to the United Nations roll call of the strip’s cuisines. It’s the newest venture from the fraternal team of James Bailey and Ivan Tarazona, best known for running Mount Pleasant’s long-standing French bistro Celestin. Bailey commands the bar with experience, mixing excellent cocktails from a range of pisco liqueurs imported from his home country. Tarazona’s kitchen is slow to get the food out, but it’s usually worth the wait. The five-course prix-fixe includes a juicy sous-vide chicken Ballantine with yellow pepper purée, and a sensational Peruvian ceviche made with sea bass, tilapia and fluke and served with toasted corn kernels, crisp sweet potato chips and raw onion. On the list of mains, the seafood-quinoa stew is a standout, loaded with tender shrimp, scallops, octopus and squid. Grilled octopus is firm and supple, but the flavour only comes alive with dollops of chimichurri. Only one dessert is available, but it’s all you need: fluffy blood orange mousse with Ontario strawberries. The tiny wine list highlights Peru’s vineyard-heavy neighbours Argentina and Chile.

NEVER MISS A TORONTO LIFE STORY

Sign up for Table Talk, our free newsletter with essential food and drink stories.

By signing up, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.
You may unsubscribe at any time.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The Latest

The Chase: This condo dweller always wanted a house. When the market cooled, she pounced
Real Estate

The Chase: This condo dweller always wanted a house. When the market cooled, she pounced