Nine vintage photos that track the Tragically Hip’s rise to CanRock royalty

Nine vintage photos that track the Tragically Hip’s rise to CanRock royalty

1988: One of the Hip’s first promotional portraits. Photograph by Getty Images

When Gord Downie stepped onto a stage, he became a man possessed. He was more shaman than showman, warbling, lunging and spewing stream-of-consciousness monologues as if leading some sweaty druidic ritual. His madman charisma was what convinced a record executive to sign the Tragically Hip in 1987 after a show at the Horseshoe Tavern—and it’s the magnetic force that’s attracted fans to the band ever since.

Last night, the Hip lost that monumental presence: after a long battle with brain cancer, Downie died at 53. We collected a series of snapshots that trace Canada’s quintessential rock band from the dorm rooms of Queen’s to sold-out stadiums. The pictures show two sides of Downie: the wild-eyed weirdo who showed up onstage, and a bookish and notoriously private poet who enjoyed fishing, watching hockey games and writing about small Ontario towns.

. Photograph by Getty Images

1990: Downie taking a stroll while on tour in the Netherlands.

1991: The band accepting their second Juno, for Canadian entertainer of the year.

. Photograph by Getty Images

1992: A band photo taken in New York the year they released their seminal album, Fully Completely.

. Photograph by CP Images

2001: Downie singing at Music Without Borders, a benefit show for Afghan refugees, at the ACC.

. Photograph by CP Images

2002: Downie picking what he called “bellybutton lint” out of the Hip’s Walk of Fame star.

. Photograph by CP Images

2005: Downie auditioned for the role of goaltender Ken Dryden in a movie about the 1972 Summit Series. He didn’t get the part.

. Photograph by Getty Images

2012: To launch their 13th album, Now for Plan A, the Hip played a surprise show in Kensington Market.

. Photograph by Getty Images

2014: The Hip performing at Yonge-Dundas Square.