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Food & Drink

Introducing: The Greek, a modern Mediterranean snack bar on King West

Introducing: The Greek, a modern Mediterranean snack bar on King West
(Image: Caroline Aksich)

Name: The Greek Neighbourhood: King West Contact Info: 567 King St. W., thegreektoronto.com Owners: Camp 4’s Gani Shqueir, Andrew Ullman and brother Michael Ullman, who co-owns nearby Bloke and 4th and EFS Chef: Greg Bourolias

The Food: Unsurprisingly, The Greek specializes in freshly prepped Greek food, including salads, skewers, pitas and snacks. Greg Bourolias, the 23-year-old chef de cuisine, designed his menu to appeal to condo dwellers and 905 club hoppers alike. Both have been lining up for his deep-fried halloumi sticks and over-the-top Greek poutine, which comes loaded with slow-roasted pork and a creamy, feta-infused sauce. For dessert, little cups of extra-thick Greek yoghurt are drizzled with honey or house-made black cherry jam.

The Place: Mediterranean and Middle Eastern food is clearly on the rise in Toronto. Like nearby It’s All GRK and Rose City Kitchen, The Greek is a modern, streamlined snack bar. Customers order from the chalkboard menu over the counter.

The Numbers: • $80 to order everything on the menu • 20 seats • 13 hours to slow-roast pork for the Greek poutine • 2 a.m. is closing time on weekends

Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek
Introducing: The Greek

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