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Slideshow: our favourite wacky and witty painted utility boxes across the city

Painted Utility Boxes
(Image: Kayla Rocca)
First, we saw a trompe d’oeil fireplace on a utility box at Queen and Victoria. Next, a whimsical piano-themed box on Bloor Street West. Then, three more eye-catching designs in the west-end. In the past few months, the city has hired local artists to decorate 20 traffic-signal cabinets across Toronto in an effort to minimize graffiti. The mini-murals, which will all be complete by the end of the October, join dozens of Bell Canada utility boxes that were gussied up as part of a similar program. The idea—to simultaneously celebrate street art and thwart vandals—has already met with success in cities like Calgary and Seattle. It‘s also a heck of a lot cooler than power washers, smartphone apps and other previous anti-graffiti measures. Here, our favourite new works of box-sized art.

See our favourite painted boxes »

Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes
Toronto’s Coolest Utility Boxes

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