Housing

Some of us want transit access. Some of us want good schools. But we can all agree on one thing: housing is crucial. Toronto Life determined the best place to buy a home by measuring affordability (cost versus average family income), quality and appreciation. We also looked at the city’s rental market, the condo craze and who owns where. The biggest takeaways: Rosedale’s property values are starting to slip, and Scarborough is a gold mine.

The best neighbourhoods for housing are

The most expensive houses are in

Bridle Path-Sunnybrook-York Mills

The highest percentage of condos are in Waterfront

South of King, condos comprise 83 per cent of all housing and sell for an average of $477,000 a pop. The fewest condos—zero, in fact—are in the super-suburban Etobicoke pocket of Princess-Rosethorn.

Rosedale is the city’s only neighbourhood with depreciating property values. They dropped five per cent in the last year.

The fastest-rising property values are in

Rouge

  • 13.73% Y/Y change
  • Avg. price in 2011: $418,356
  • Avg. price in 2015: $585,736
  • On the market: 92 Misty Hills Trail, listed
    at $569,000

Malvern

  • 13.73% Y/Y change
  • Avg. price in 2011: $285,601
  • Avg. price in 2015: $353,112
  • On the market: 19 Lenthall Ave., listed
    at $599,000

Centennial Scarborough

  • 13.28% Y/Y change
  • Avg. price in 2011: $455,705
  • Avg. price in 2015: $675,161
  • On the market: 35 St. Magnus Dr., listed
    at $1.4 million

Yonge-Eglinton

  • 11.32% Y/Y change
  • Avg. price in 2011: $899,866
  • Avg. price in 2015: $1 million
  • On the market: 46 Castlefield Ave., listed
    at $1.8 million

Corso Italia-Davenport

  • 11.15% Y/Y change
  • Avg. price in 2011: $466,783
  • Avg. price in 2015: $673,014
  • On the market: 102 Auburn
  • Ave., listed at $959,000

East vs. West

Real estate in the east end is slightly cheaper than in the west, averaging $614,956 versus $639,533. The most expensive east-end ’hood is Playter Estates-Danforth, which averages $1.2 million. In the west, it’s Kingsway South at $1.4 million.

Downtown vs. Suburbs

Contrary to popular belief, housing downtown runs cheaper than in North York—probably due to the condo boom. It averages $559,300, versus $735,736. The priciest real estate in the core is in Cabbagetown, which averages $800,066. North of the 401, it’s Bayview Woods-Steeles at $972,106.

The highest percentage of owners live in

The highest percentage of renters live in

The best housing stock is in

Waterfront

97.7%

(Homes that did not require major repair)

Willowdale East

97.7%

Princess-Rosethorn

97.6%

Rouge

97.5%

Niagara

97.5%

The worst housing stock is in

Regent Park

17.4%

(Homes that required major repair)

Scarborough Village

17.1%

Oakridge

15.2%

Woodbine-Lumsden

14.9%

Black Creek

14.8%

The cheapest houses are in

Flemingdon Park

$262,258

(Average home price)

These are the top condo hubs in the city

We found condo-booming neighbourhoods that also score high for affordability, appreciation and quality. Here, the best places to buy

Waterfront Communities

83% condo housing
The buy:
Lighthouse Tower, part of Daniels’ million-square-foot mixed-use development on the old Guvernment grounds

Niagara

73% condo housing
The buy:
Garrison Point, from architects Hariri Pontarini, has lots of family-friendly units, a playroom and an outdoor pool with splash pad

Willowdale East

70% condo housing
The buy:
Beacon Condos, a new 35-storey tower at Yonge and Park Home with a gaming lounge, spa, steam room and yoga studio

Bay Street Corridor

69% condo housing
The buy:
The Britt, the new 41-storey complex that replaced Sutton Place. The big sells: an infinity pool and spa with private cabanas

Bayview Village

49% condo housing
The buy:
Condos at the new mid-rise hub Vida will feature private terraces, soaker tubs and marble finishes. There are also a sports bar and fitness centre

Edited by Emily Landau. Designed by Brennan Higginbotham and Matthew Warland. Research by Richard Florida, Vass Bednar, Isabel Ritchie and Greg Spencer at the Martin Prosperity Institute. Interactive by Tim Burden and Jennifer Abela-Froese. Illustration by Chloe Cushman. Additional reporting by Simon Bredin, Rebecca Philps and Reanna Sartoretto.