Snow White copyright violated, British cheese outsells French cheese, Twitter starts selling wine

Snow White copyright violated, British cheese outsells French cheese, Twitter starts selling wine

Hi, Ho: an Australian beer company's "Ho" White is in a tight spot with Disney (Image courtesy of adelaidenow.com.au) 

• In Australia, an ad campaign for Jamieson’s raspberry ale has re-imagined Snow White as a coquettish sexpot, and surprise, surprise, Disney is not amused. In the ad, Snow White—or as Jamieson’s has so cleverly renamed her, “Ho White”—is seen blowing smoke rings in bed with seven dwarves and no bra. The dwarves have also had name changes, like Filthy, Smarmy and Randy. [Sky News].

• Marks and Spencer is now selling more U.K. cheese than French cheese, and the news couldn’t make Tim Hayward happier. The British blogger calls it a “bloody triumph” in an otherwise dismal country. Hayward suggests that this cheese victory is reason for Britons to celebrate the end of summer with a spontaneous cheese-VE Day. [Guardian]

• When we think of things that should never be associated with wine, our brain jumps immediately to Dan Aykroyd. But this may change: we’ve heard that Twitter is getting its own wine label. Fledgling Wine, as it will be called, will sell a pinot noir and a chardonnay for $20 a bottle. The proceeds will go to a literacy foundation, because as the Twitter co-founders say, “If you can’t read, you can’t tweet.” [Washington Post]

• David Levey, winner of Hell’s Kitchen, will join the kitchen staff at Araxi Restaurant and Bar in Whistler. The San Diego resident is, according to Araxi executive chef James Walt, “probably the most Whistler-like” of the three Hell’s Kitchen finalists, attributing this, in part, to the fact that Levey wears a tuque. [CTV]

• Childhood obesity has doubled in the past 25 years, which could lead to a “tsunami of health problems” later in life—so says Parent Central, a Toronto Star Web site that draws a link between this and the fact that Canada is the only western country without a federally funded food program for kids. The article goes on to cite research that supports food literacy programs, in which students and teachers learn about food together. [Parent Central]