At 97 years old, Laura Secord wants a younger image, just not too young

At 97 years old, Laura Secord wants a younger image, just not too young

A box of Lauras is many a grandma's holiday staple 

A few days ago, we reported on Laura Secord’s return to Canada. The company is named after the Canadian historic figure who helped Brits and Canadians stave off U.S. invasion during the War of 1812; founded in Canada in 1913, the chocolatier was, ironically, taken over by U.S. investors in 1983. Despite plans by its new owner, the Quebec chocolate company Nutriart Inc., to revitalize the brand, the company is allaying worries that a corporate facelift will undermine Secord’s grandmotherly appeal. “The last thing we will do at Laura Secord is be ashamed of our age,” said Jean Leclerc, the company’s new president. “There will be changes, but they will be gradual.”

Nutriart will introduce a new prototype store, the model for future renovations, over the next three years, in the hopes of drawing younger customers and invigorating the brand before its centennial. The chocolate base Secord uses will be made at Nutriart’s Quebec City plant, rather than by the Pennsylvania company that was once the sole supplier. There are also plans to get Laura Secord products in U.S. stores within the next few years, but there are currently no stand-alone locations in the works.

Laura Secord’s new owners won’t run away from appeal to Canadian grandmas [Canadian Press]
• Laura Secord returns to Canadian ownership [Toronto Life]