Bank of Canada set to distribute new see-through currency, making Canadians’ payment choices plastic, plastic or plastic

Bank of Canada set to distribute new see-through currency, making Canadians’ payment choices plastic, plastic or plastic

Canada’s cotton paper money will soon be a relic of the past (Image: Diego Torres Silvestre) 

The era of paper money is coming to an end, and not just because everybody loves to pay with debit or credit cards. Even the Bank of Canada is getting in on the action, replacing paper money with plastic cash. We’re a touch confused by the whole initiative (a “frontier” theme?), but it’s apparently all about saving—what else?—money.

From the Toronto Star:

Beginning in November, Canadians will see new polymer $100 bills that are as smooth as plastic, contain a see-through window to confound counterfeiters and are supposed to last years longer than the cotton currency being issued now.

The new money, which will be phased in over several years, will have the same distinct dominant colour for each denomination as today’s money, but the themes and security features are changing.

Basically, the new bills are changing in three important ways: 1) they’re plastic; 2) they’ll last longer (the plastic bills are expected to last 2.5 times longer than their paper predecessors); and 3) they’ll have a see-through window that’s designed to stymie counterfeiters (the window contains intricate holograms that can be seen from either side). Apparently, the theme of the bills is set to be “frontiers,” and the new $100 bill will celebrate Canada’s contribution to medical innovation. The next bill that will hit the market—the $50—features an image of the CCGS Amundsen, an Arctic research icebreaker.

The Bank of Canada also noted that the new currency would neither perish in the dryer nor freeze in the cold. Less important, sure, but perhaps a little closer to our hearts (yes, even closer than the CCGS Amundsen).

New plastic $100 bills are see through [Toronto Star]